indoor air quality

Cystic fibrosis – Using natural materials in the home, to create better indoor air quality. (part 1)

This is the first part in a series of posts about creating healthy homes with natural materials for people who have cystic fibrosis. The following topics will be covered:

  • Part 1 – Cystic fibrosis and how indoor air quality has an impact
  • Part 2 – The design and materials choices we have chosen to create the healthiest indoor air quality
  • Part 3 – Household product choices to help cystic fibrosis

I am working with Rebecca and Daniel to renovate their home, a 1930’s semi. Rebecca is a student, studying P-DTR and a pilates instructor, Daniel is a garden designer. Rebecca has Cystic Fibrosis (CF), a genetic condition affecting more than 10,800 people in the UK. Continue reading

The finished limewashed house

lime wash – How to make a hot mix

We just finished applying a hot lime wash to our ‘Ty Twt‘ building in Wales. Here you can see the finished building.

Ty Twt with its final coat of hot lime wash.
Ty Twt with its final coat of hot lime wash.

Ty Twt is a load bearing straw bale house completed by my company, Hartwyn using our intern building model. The house was completed in 11 weeks in 2016, with a final weekend to finish up the lime and green roof just completed in July 2017. Continue reading

Passive solar explained

passive solar design

What is passive solar design?

Passive solar design is a very premise on how to use the sun to heat your home in the winter. This fantastic video by Community Rebuilds intern Rebecca Barrett sums up the fundamentals.

It’s so simple, right?

All the houses I build with my company Hartwyn use these design principles.

Largest windows are on the South side and are sheltered from the hot midday summer sun. Thermal mass in the form of earthen floors, clay plasters or rammed earth walls store the heat from the sun. Highly insulating natural fibres keeps the warmth inside to keep you cosy.

straw bale home

Groundwork Natural Building Video Series

Sculpted by hand from a mixture of clay, sand and straw, building houses out of cob is a full mind and body experience; one that requires patience. But these homes are worth the wait!

Building on ancient traditions, today’s timber framers and selective loggers are forging a sustainable future. Visit the people behind some of the most intriguing wooden structures in British Columbia

It seems counterintuitive that a framework packed with straw bales could create such a sturdy home. In fact, the straw acts as a natural vapour permeable insulation that allows these buildings to breathe.

A rammed earth wall is durable, energy efficient, and made from the most abundant material on the planet. Learn how these builders and homeowners applied this ancient technique to create timeless contemporary homes.

**I don’t agree with adding cement to a rammed earth wall. It doesn’t need it, and it actually changes the way the walls handle moisture for the worse while making the walls too rigid. Cement has been added over the years because people don’t understand. It’s such a shame!

From the Ground Up’s work on Bandevi School which will house approximately 450 students.

Earth blocks are being used by my friend to rebuild a school destroyed by the 2015 earthquake in Nepal.

Click here to support the project

https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/jenny-wilkie?utm_term=AypmKzNjp

We are fundraising to contribute towards the large cost of buying a truck for FTGU to allow them to transport materials for the rebuild of Bandevi School which was destroyed in the 2015 earthquake.
Currently, funds which should be getting spent on materials are being spent on transport of materials to the remote building site. Buying this truck will create 3 more jobs and will allow FTGU to continue investing in the Ghumarchowk community for years to come.
To raise the money needed, we are offering you the chance to be a part of the school. Making bricks in our brick machines which were hand-built by Nick is a labour intensive, slow process but the bricks are very strong and will hopefully save childrens’ lives in the event of another earthquake. The 6 new classrooms will safely house approximately 450 students.
How can you help? Sponsor a brick for £5.00 and be part of something truly amazing. We will spray your name on the brick(s) and send you a photo to show you what you’re supporting. Sponsor more than 50 bricks, and we will put your name on a plaque above the entrance to the school, your legacy will live on forever!
Thank you for helping us to help this much deserving community.
www.facebook.com/ftguinternational

See more of the earthquake’s effect.